UM Today | UM Today the Magazine | Spring 2021 | The Mummy Whisperer

It’s not a career choice for the faint-hearted. Meet the eccentric alumna who unearths important stories from the ancient past in the name of cultural preservation and out of respect for those who came before.
— Read on news.umanitoba.ca/the-mummy-whisperer/

This is an very interesting in-depth examination of this research avenue.

Lifelike face of a tattooed Tashtyk man seen for first time behind a stunning gypsum death mask

Aged 25 to 30 when he died 1,700 years ago, he is from the mountainous region of modern-day Khakassia.
— Read on siberiantimes.com/science/casestudy/features/this-tattooed-tashtyk-man-was-found-half-a-century-ago-yet-now-for-the-first-time-we-can-see-his-lifelike-face/

Brazilian Cerrado savanna: miners descend on Indigenous reserve

The Raposa Serra do Sol Indigenous reserve in Brazil’s Roraima state covers 1.75 million hectares (4.32 million acres) along the nation’s border with Venezuela and Guyana. It is home to 26,705 Indigenous people.

The territory has been under pressure from invaders for decades, even after being demarcated in 2005. But illegal incursions are reaching a new peak now, with an estimated 2,000 to 5,000 gold miners operating in the reserve.
Incendiary speeches by Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro have emboldened the miners, say experts, while attempts to crackdown on wildcat mining in the Yanomami Territory in the Amazon rainforest may have pushed illegal miners operating there into the Cerrado savanna where most of Raposa Serra do Sol is located.
— Read on news.mongabay.com/2021/04/brazilian-cerrado-savanna-wildcat-miners-descend-on-indigenous-reserve/

Everything You Need To Know About Blue Java Banana That Tastes Like Vanilla Ice Cream

Apart from the regular yellow banana and the raw green banana, chances are you have come across the red banana. But have you ever seen a blue banana? No, right? Well, you might find this bizarre, but a blue banana actually exists and it apparently tastes like vanilla ice cream!

— Read on www.idiva.com/lifestyle/food/everything-you-need-to-know-about-blue-java-banana-that-tastes-like-vanilla-ice-cream/18019238

Only 3 percent of Earth’s land hasn’t been marred by humans | Science News

Only 3 percent of Earth’s land hasn’t been marred by humans | Science News
— Read on www.sciencenews.org/article/earth-land-ecosystems-ecology-intact-species

Penn Museum announces the repatriation of the Morton Cranial Collection | Penn Today

The remains of Black Philadelphians within the Samuel G. Morton Cranial collection will be repatriated or reburied, based on a report that outlined recommendations from the Morton Collection Committee.
— Read on penntoday.upenn.edu/news/penn-museum-announces-repatriation-morton-cranial-collection

Indigenous land-use reduced catastrophic wildfires on the Fish Lake Plateau | @theU

1,000 years ago, Indigenous people practiced cultural burning, which reduced the risk for large-scale wildfire activity in mountain environments—even during periods of drought more extreme and prolonged than today.
— Read on attheu.utah.edu/facultystaff/wildfires-on-fish-lake-plateau/

2020 Massey Lectures: Renowned tech expert Ronald J. Deibert to explore disturbing impact of social media | CBC Radio

Citizen Lab director Ronald J. Deibert will deliver this year’s Massey Lectures, arguing that the internet, especially social media, has an increasingly toxic influence in every aspect of life.
— Read on www.cbc.ca/radio/ideas/2020-massey-lectures-renowned-tech-expert-ronald-j-deibert-to-explore-disturbing-impact-of-social-media-1.5640204

Study Pushes Back Herding in Central Asia by 3,000 Years – Archaeology Magazine

Study Pushes Back Herding in Central Asia by 3,000 Years – Archaeology Magazine
— Read on www.archaeology.org/news/9627-210412-central-asia-herding

Innovative Homo sapiens behaviours 105,000 years ago in a wetter Kalahari | Nature

The archaeological record of Africa provides the earliest evidence for the emergence of the complex symbolic and technological behaviours that characterize Homo sapiens1–7. The coastal setting of many archaeological sites of the Late Pleistocene epoch, and the abundant shellfish remains recovered from them, has led to a dominant narrative in which modern human origins in southern Africa are intrinsically tied to the coast and marine resources8–12, and behavioural innovations in the interior lag behind. However, stratified Late Pleistocene sites with good preservation and robust chronologies are rare in the interior of southern Africa, and the coastal hypothesis therefore remains untested. Here we show that early human innovations that are similar to those dated to around 105 thousand years ago (ka) in coastal southern Africa existed at around the same time among humans who lived over 600 km inland. We report evidence for the intentional collection of non-utilitarian objects (calcite crystals) and ostrich eggshell from excavations of a stratified rockshelter deposit in the southern Kalahari Basin, which we date by optically stimulated luminescence to around 105 ka. Uranium–thorium dating of relict tufa deposits indicates sporadic periods of substantial volumes of fresh, flowing water; the oldest of these episodes is dated to between 110 and 100 ka and is coeval with the archaeological deposit. Our results suggest that behavioural innovations among humans in the interior of southern Africa did not lag behind those of populations near the coast, and that these innovations may have developed within a wet savannah environment. Models that tie the emergence of behavioural innovations to the exploitation of coastal resources by our species may therefore require revision. Human populations in the southern Africa interior were collecting non-utilitarian objects at around 105,000 years ago, suggesting that the development of this innovative behaviour did not depend on exploiting coastal resources.
— Read on www.nature.com/articles/s41586-021-03419-0