Manatees are dying in droves this year. Here’s why the die-offs spell trouble for Florida – CNN

Decades of environmental stress culminated this year in one of the worst manatee die-offs in recent history: As of May 21, at least 749 manatees have died in Florida in 2021, in what has been called an unusual mortality event.
— Read on edition.cnn.com/2021/05/30/us/manatee-deaths-florida-2021-trnd/index.html

Threshold Conversations with John Noksana, Caroline Behe, and Mumilaaq Qaqqaq

In this episode, John Noksana, Carolina Behe, and Mumilaaq Qaqqaq sit down with Threshold producers Amy Martin and Nick Mott to discuss Inuit food security and Inuit sovereignty in the North.

John, an Inuit hunter from Northern Canada, and Carolina, the Indigenous Knowledge and Science Advisor for the Inuit Circumpolar Council in Alaska, discuss how food security fits into a bigger picture of Inuit self-determination. Then, we hear from Mumilaaq, who’s addressing that bigger picture on an even larger stage: in Canada’s Parliament.
— Read on www.thresholdpodcast.org/conversations-inuit

How the Word is Passed

In ‘How the Word is Passed,’ writer and poet Clint Smith visits eight places central to the history of slavery in America, including Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello plantation and Louisiana’s Angola prison. “We are taught that the history of slavery is something that happened almost like when there were dinosaurs,” he says. But Smith notes that his grandfather’s grandfather was enslaved — and that “this history that we are told was so long ago wasn’t, in fact, that long ago at all.”

The Problem of ‘Colonial Science’ – Scientific American

Seventy percent of our coastlines are in the developing world, but representation at the global stage is disproportional. The harsh truth is, if we aren’t being inclusive and equitable, we aren’t going to move the needle on the things that really matter, the things that are integral to our very existence, and we will continue to fail. As humans continue to destroy habitats and explore the last wild places, we can look forward to more frequent unintended consequences like pandemics and perhaps even global lockdowns. Building the mechanisms that would enable us to continue the important work of conservation no matter what, should be our priority. So, if we truly want to save our oceans, never forget: every coastline needs a local hero.

— Read on www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-problem-of-colonial-science/

New enigmatic geoglyphs in the Indian Thar Desert: The largest graphic realizations of mankind? – ScienceDirect

New enigmatic geoglyphs in the Indian Thar Desert: The largest graphic realizations of mankind? – ScienceDirect
— Read on www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S2352226721000362

Short Cuts #311 – Standoff At Fairy Creek – CANADALAND – Omny.fm

Covering BC’s anti-logging protests raise issues about journalists’ decorum, access, and how stories about land protectors are framed. And Native Twitter gets a CNN pundit fired for spewing racist views about Indigenous people. 

— Read on omny.fm/shows/cndlnd/short-cuts-311-standoff-at-fairy-creek

REAL ESTATE 3 – Terminal City – COMMONS – Omny.fm

Vancouver is obsessed with real estate. But what most people don’t realize, is that it’s been this way from the beginning. 

Three stories of the swindlers, segregationists and profiteers that made Terminal City what it is.
— Read on omny.fm/shows/commonspod/real-estate-3-terminal-city

CBC Gem – CBC Docs POV – Angry Inuk

Exploring how Inuit hunters in remote communities in the high arctic are negatively affected by animal rights groups protesting against the Canadian east coast seal hunt that happens a thousand kilometers away.
— Read on gem.cbc.ca/media/cbc-docs-pov/season-1/episode-9/38e815a-00d62667222

Petroglyph vandalism is not a victimless crime — High Country News – Know the West

Indigenous archaeologists say more protective measures and education are needed to prevent future vandalism
— Read on www.hcn.org/articles/indigenous-affairs-archaeology-petroglyph-vandalism-is-not-a-victimless-crime/

Indigenous co-management essential for protecting, restoring Bears Ears region – HeritageDaily – Archaeology News

Indigenous people have lived in the Bears Ears region of southeastern Utah for millennia. Ancestral Pueblos built elaborate houses, check dams, agricultural terraces and other modifications of the landscape, leaving ecological legacies that persist to this day. – HeritageDaily – Archaeology News
— Read on www.heritagedaily.com/2021/05/indigenous-co-management-essential-for-protecting-restoring-bears-ears-region/139204