Prehistoric Moms May Have Cared for Kids Better Than We Thought | Lab Manager

A new study from The Australian National University (ANU) has revealed the death rate of babies in ancient societies is not a reflection of poor health care, disease, and other factors, but instead is an indication of the number of babies born in that era.

The findings shed new light on the history of our ancestors and debunk old assumptions that infant mortality rates were consistently high in ancient populations.

The study also opens up the possibility mothers from early human societies may have been much more capable of caring for their children than previously thought.

“It has long been assumed that if there are a lot of deceased babies in a burial sample, then infant mortality must have been high,” lead author Dr. Clare McFadden, from the ANU School of Archaeology and Anthropology, said.

“Many have assumed that infant mortality was very high in the past in the absence of modern health care,” McFadden said. “When we look at these burial samples, it actually tells us more about the number of babies that were born and tells us very little about the number of babies that were dying, which is counterintuitive to past perceptions.”
— Read on www.labmanager.com/news/prehistoric-moms-may-have-cared-for-kids-better-than-we-thought-27121

Opinion | Republicans’ anti-CRT fight is not about parental control – The Washington Post

GOP activists are gunning for critical race theory, LGBTQ books and now … mental health?
— Read on www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2021/11/18/parental-choice-critical-race-theory-schools-gop-control/

Emad Atiq, Legal Positivism and the Moral Origins of Legal Systems – PhilArchive

Legal positivists maintain that the legality of a rule is fundamentally determined by social facts. Yet for much of legal history, ordinary officials used legal terminology in ways that seem inconsistent …
— Read on philarchive.org/rec/ATILPA

Visualizations show the extensive cloud of debris Russia’s anti-satellite test created – The Verge

“This is not going to be a short-lived problem,” says Lewis. “It’s going to be affecting space operations for at least this decade and the next one.”
— Read on www.theverge.com/2021/11/19/22791176/russia-asat-satellite-test-space-debris-visualizations

Are there consequences for being a rogue state?

Reducing sodium and increasing potassium may lower risk of cardiovascular disease | News | Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Large-scale study of more than 10,000 adults with accurate sodium measurements from individuals strengthens link between sodium intake and cardiovascular disease
— Read on www.hsph.harvard.edu/news/press-releases/reducing-sodium-and-increasing-potassium-may-lower-risk-of-cardiovascular-disease/

Yes, plant-based meat is better for fighting climate change – Vox

The environmental debate over meatless meat, explained.
— Read on www.vox.com/22787178/beyond-impossible-plant-based-vegetarian-meat-climate-environmental-impact-sustainability

Scan of the Month

Engineers know that controlling plastics with precision is a challenge.

LEGO knows a thing or two about plastics. They manufacture hundreds of millions of Minifigures per year. These figures are assemblies with moving parts. Each one must work with every other LEGO ever created. Pulling off perfection on this scale is impressive. That’s why, in the minds of engineers, the LEGO mythos is all about precision.

Well, you might be surprised by what is hiding inside. Scroll down to reveal what is within through CT scans.
— Read on www.scanofthemonth.com/

Mysteries of Ancient Egypt’s Sacred Baboons Revealed – Scientific American

When I recounted this tale to my Kenyan colleagues, it elicited knowing nods and a proverb: “Not all baboons that enter a maize field come out satisfied.” Like many African proverbs, this one is layered with meaning. It alludes to the monkeys’ insatiable crop raiding while simultaneously evoking sinister intent. Catherine M. Hill, a professor of anthropology at Oxford Brookes University in England, has found that baboons exact a devastating toll, reducing crop yields by half for some families in western Uganda. Indeed, baboons are the foremost pest for many subsistence farmers in Africa, and cultural aversions to the animals run deep. If erasure is the ultimate measure of contempt, then it is telling that in the art and handicraft traditions of sub-Saharan Africa, baboons are largely absent. This history makes the ancient Egyptians’ worship of this creature—and its ubiquity in their art—deeply perplexing.

— Read on www.scientificamerican.com/article/mysteries-of-ancient-egypts-sacred-baboons-revealed/

Chip Shortage Has Manufacturers Turning to Lower-Tech Models – WSJ

Makers of appliances and other products are adapting designs, shipping uncompleted units and focusing on older, lower-tech models because of the global shortage of semiconductors.
— Read on www.wsj.com/articles/chip-shortage-has-manufacturers-turning-to-lower-tech-models-11636885801

Chocolate contains cadmium that can increase cancer risk

But behind its delicious taste, cacao contains cadmium, a chemical substance harmful to kidneys. It also increases the risk of cancer.

If we compare it to other harmful heavy metals like arsenic, cadmium may not seem to be that bad. But, exposure to cadmium for a long time, even in small amounts, can be dangerous as it accumulates in the body. Our body needs ten to thirty years to digest cadmium.

This is why the European Commission last year decreased the safety threshold of the amount of cadmium in processed chocolate in the region. The cadmium threshold is between 0.1 and 0.8 milligrams per kilogram of chocolate, depending on the type of chocolate.

Dark chocolate, for instance, has a lower ceiling than milk chocolate. All chocolate imported to Europe have to comply with the limit.

Europe’s decision was based on research that showed even though cadmium exposure in adult non-smokers in the region is still below WHO’s upper limit, exposure through food in children reaches twice the safe limit.
— Read on theconversation.com/amp/chocolate-contains-cadmium-that-can-increase-cancer-risk-131155